Ayesha Rascoe

Ayesha Rascoe is a White House correspondent for NPR. She is currently covering her third presidential administration. Rascoe's White House coverage has included a number of high profile foreign trips, including President Trump's 2019 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi, Vietnam, and President Obama's final NATO summit in Warsaw, Poland in 2016. As a part of the White House team, she's also a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to joining NPR, Rascoe covered the White House for Reuters, chronicling Obama's final year in office and the beginning days of the Trump administration. Rascoe began her reporting career at Reuters, covering energy and environmental policy news, such as the 2010 BP oil spill and the U.S. response to the Fukushima nuclear crisis in 2011. She also spent a year covering energy legal issues and court cases.

She graduated from Howard University in 2007 with a B.A. in journalism.

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The pandemic worsened economic equality. So what does the Biden administration plan to do about it? NPR's Ayesha Rascoe talked with Janelle Jones, the chief economist at the Labor Department and the first Black woman to hold that job.

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President Trump pardoned some more people last night - among them, his friends, his loyalists and his daughter's in-law. NPR White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe is following this one. Good morning, Ayesha.

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Well, President Trump now says he has problems with the COVID relief bill Congress passed earlier this week. Here's Trump last night.

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All right. As we know, President Trump is not the only person at the White House who's been laid up by the coronavirus. There is a cluster of cases tied to the White House, as Dr. Anthony Fauci told CBS News today.

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Some of our colleagues were also watching last night, including NPR White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe and our senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.

Good morning to you both.

AYESHA RASCOE, BYLINE: Good morning.

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With the White House as his stage, President Trump accepted his party's nomination last night at the Republican National Convention. He attacked Joe Biden and framed voters' choice in November this way.

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President Trump promised a convention that would be uplifting and positive as a response to the Democrats. There were a lot of moments last night that did not seem to fulfill that promise.

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