Sunday Puzzle: Rhyme Time

Jul 21, 2019
Originally published on July 21, 2019 6:58 am

On-air challenge: I'm going to give you two 4-letter words. Rearrange the letters in each of them to make two new words that rhyme.

Example: CAFE, SAVE --> FACE, VASE

1. COLA, LOSE

2. NEAR, RENT

3. LIVE, LIMA

4. DAIS, DEAL

5. SING, DENY

6. EACH, BEAK

7. OPUS, POLO

8. PALE, KEEN

9. RELY, RITE

10. ONCE, NEWS

11. OARS, OGRE

12. WENT, ROTO

13, THAW, THUS

14. ISLE, ZEAL

Last week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Eric Berlin. Take an 11-letter word with two D's in it. If you drop both D's, you'll get a world capital followed by a sign of the zodiac. What's the 11-letter word?

Challenger answer: DROMEDARIES --> Rome, Aries

Winner: Alan Winson of Oakland, Calif.

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. Think of a common two-word phrase, in nine letters, naming something that makes it easy to get money. Rearrange its letters to spell another common two-word phrase naming something that makes it hard to get money. What phrases are these?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, July 25 at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

It's forecast to be a hot day for a lot of the country, so before the temperature peaks, let's take a cooling plunge into the Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzlemaster. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Hi, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Eric Berlin. I said take an 11-letter word with two D's in it. If you drop both D's, you'll get a world capital, followed by a sign of the zodiac. What's the word? And the word is Dromedaries. You drop those two D's, and you get Rome and Aries.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received over 1,100 responses, and the winner this week is Alan Winson of Oakland, Calif. Congratulations.

ALAN WINSON: Thanks, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So how'd you figure it out?

WINSON: Well, you have 11 letters, you drop two D's - that leaves you with only nine letters to make a capital and a zodiac sign, so they both had to be short. And I was going to do it the hard way, but then I realized if I just thought about a few, Rome came to mind and then Aries seemed like a good fit and then I got dromedaries.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go. So, Alan, are you ready to play the Puzzle?

WINSON: I am.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right. Alan, I'm going to give you two four-letter words. Rearrange the letters in each of them to make two new words that rhyme. For example, if I said cafe and save, you would say face and vase.

WINSON: OK.

SHORTZ: All right. No. 1 is cola - C-O-L-A - and lose - L-O-S-E.

WINSON: Coal and sole.

SHORTZ: That's it. Near - N-E-A-R - and rent - R-E-N-T.

WINSON: Let's see - earn and tern.

SHORTZ: Nice. Live - L-I-V-E - and Lima - L-I-M-A.

WINSON: Veil and mail.

SHORTZ: Good. Dais - D-A-I-S - and deal - D-E-A-L.

WINSON: Said and lead.

SHORTZ: That's fast. Sing - S-I-N-G - and deny - D-E-N-Y.

WINSON: Gind (ph) no - deny. What can you rearrange deny to spell? Dyne and sign.

SHORTZ: There you go. Good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You are really good at this, by the way. Wow.

SHORTZ: Let's try this one - each - E-A-C-H and beak - B-E-A-K.

WINSON: B-E-A-K - so that would be bake and ache.

SHORTZ: That's it. Opus - O-P-U-S and polo - P-O-L-O.

WINSON: Let's see - loop and soup.

SHORTZ: Pale - P-A-L-E - and keen - K-E-E-N.

WINSON: Keen - that's a weird one. What can you make from keen? Oh, knee and plea.

SHORTZ: That's it, good one. Rely - R-E-L-Y - rite - R-I-T-E.

WINSON: Tire and lyre.

SHORTZ: Good. Once - O-N-C-E - news - N-E-W-S.

WINSON: Once would make cone. It doesn't work.

SHORTZ: Yes, it does.

WINSON: Oh, cone and sewn.

SHORTZ: That's it. Good. Oars - O-A-R-S - ogre - O-G-R-E.

WINSON: Ogre, OK. So - no, let's see - gore - soar and gore.

SHORTZ: That's it. Went - W-E-N-T - roto - R-O-T-O.

WINSON: Roto - let's see. Went - what can you - newt and root.

SHORTZ: That's it. Thaw - T-H-A-W - and thus - T-H-U-S.

WINSON: T-H-U-S - thaw - wow. A what - no...

SHORTZ: Oh, yeah, that's it, except I'd pronounce that with a short U sound.

WINSON: Oh, you say what.

SHORTZ: I say what.

WINSON: So it's shut.

SHORTZ: That's it, what and shut. And here's your last one. It's not just rhymes. It's homophones. And the words are isle - I-S-L-E - and zeal - Z-E-A-L.

WINSON: Z-E-A-L?

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

WINSON: Let's see - lies and laze - oh, leis - L-E-I-S - and laze.

SHORTZ: You got it. Good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wait a second, Alan. You are amazing at this. That was incredible. That was...

WINSON: Well, thanks.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: No, really, really.

WINSON: Well, four-letter anagrams, there's a limited number of possibilities.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Well, thank you for letting us know that.

WINSON: I think that's what makes it possible.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I guess so, but you did really well.

WINSON: Well, thanks.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And that is incredibly impressive. How do you feel?

WINSON: I feel great.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You should. All right. For playing our Puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, Alan, your member station - what do you listen to?

WINSON: KQED in San Francisco.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Alan Winson of Oakland, Calif. Thank you so much for playing the Puzzle so exceptionally well.

WINSON: Thanks, Lulu. Thanks, Will.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, tell us next week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. The challenge comes from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. Think of a common two-word phrase, in nine letters, naming something that makes it easy to get money. Rearrange these letters to spell another common two-word phrase, naming something that makes it hard to get money. What phrases are these? So, again, common two-word phrase, nine letters, name something that makes it easy to get money. Rearrange the letters, get another common two-word phrase naming something that makes it hard to get money. What phrases are these?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember; just one entry per person please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, July 25 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.