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1 killed at Chiefs parade shooting; Russia is developing a space-based nuclear device

People flee after shots were fired near the Kansas City Chiefs' Super Bowl victory parade on Feb.14 in Kansas City, Mo.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds
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AFP via Getty Images
People flee after shots were fired near the Kansas City Chiefs' Super Bowl victory parade on Feb.14 in Kansas City, Mo.

Good morning. You're reading the Up First newsletter. Subscribe here to get it delivered to your inbox, and listen to the Up First podcast for all the news you need to start your day.

Today's top stories

A woman was killed, and at least 21 others, including children, were injured in a shooting yesterday at the end of the Chiefs Super Bowl parade in Kansas City, Mo. At least three people have been arrested, according to police. Lisa Lopez-Galvan, a mother of two and a popular radio DJ, died in surgery.

  • Police have not released a motive or the suspects' names, NPR network station reporter Frank Morris reports on Up First from KCUR in Kansas City. After a joyous celebration packed with families and kids, Morris says the public is now left to grapple with the "bewildering anguish that comes after a mass shooting."
  • See photos from the scene.


Russia is developing a space-based nuclear capability that could be used to target satellites, according to a source familiar with the matter. National security adviser Jake Sullivan is expected to meet with House leaders today, though he did not confirm the briefing's topic.

  • NPR's Geoff Brumfiel says it's notable the U.S. called the device a "nuclear capability" and not a bomb. The international Outer Space Treaty bans states from placing in the Earth's orbit "any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction." Though the U.S. has accused Russia of breaking other treaties, violating this one would "run a lot of risks," Brumfiel says.


The bubonic plague has appeared in Oregon for the first time in nearly a decade. Health officials say the person likely caught it from their cat. Doctors treated the patient with antibiotics and gave their contacts medication. They don't expect the disease to spread or cause any deaths. So, just how dangerous is the disease that caused the Black Death — the 14th-century pandemic that killed 30% to 50% in parts of Europe? Here's what you need to know.

From our hosts

Jan Vogler plays a 1707 Stradivari cello made during Bach's lifetime. He compares it to learning to swim in an Olympic pool: "the pressure on me is more to have imagination to match the instrument."
Zayrha Rodriguez / NPR
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NPR
Jan Vogler plays a 1707 Stradivari cello made during Bach's lifetime. He compares it to learning to swim in an Olympic pool: "the pressure on me is more to have imagination to match the instrument."

This essay was written by Michel Martin, one of Morning Edition and Up First's hosts.

I have a running joke with a producer I work with a lot. Because we're based in different cities, there's a lot of texting or emailing. So when we finally get to talk, some catching up has to happen. If I happen to mention seeing some movie or concert that people are talking about, she invariably asks me, "Are you forever changed?"

I find this hilarious because, of course, she wants me to say yes. But the answer is almost always no. But then, a few days ago, I heard Amanda Gorman and Jan Vogler.

Vogler is a cellist with a lot of energy and ideas; a few years ago, he worked with actor Bill Murray on a performance that included readings and occasional dancing. It eventually became a documentary. Gorman made history as America's youngest inaugural poet in 2021. Vogler had the notion to pair Gorman's poetry with the Bach cello suites; she agreed. The fruit of their work will be heard at Carnegie Hall on Saturday. I (and now you) had the privilege of a sneak preview.

And somehow, yes, I do feel changed.

Gorman's work has this remarkable, restorative quality. For some reason, I feel better every time I hear her. Vogler called it her optimism. His music also left me feeling like I was walking on clouds. He said something that has stuck with me: "Poetry, there's this in between the words, and with music, it's the same — in between the notes, actually, the real message happens."

Between the notes, between the words...the real message happens.

Deep Dive

Temu has soared in popularity since it launched in 2022. Here, a photo illustration shows the Temu app in an app store reflected in videos of Temu consumers in Washington, D.C.
Stefani Reynolds / AFP via Getty Images
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AFP via Getty Images
Temu has soared in popularity since it launched in 2022. Here, a photo illustration shows the Temu app in an app store reflected in videos of Temu consumers in Washington, D.C.

Temu's catchy Super Bowl ad promised users would be able to "shop like a billionaire." The Chinese-owned discount e-commerce app has enjoyed explosive growth in the past year. As of Tuesday, Temu held the top spot on Apple's list of shopping apps, followed by Shein, Shopify and Amazon. Its rise in popularity has fueled skepticism from consumers and U.S. officials alike. Here's what you need to know before shopping:

Temu offers low prices in part because it promises a direct, streamlined link between consumers and Chinese manufacturers.

Unlike the fast-fashion company Shein, Temu focuses more on home goods and plasticware than clothing, making it one of Amazon's biggest threats.

Lawmakers say Temu is abusing a loophole in a U.S. law that lets companies skip import fees on smaller shipments by sending individual packages to people's homes rather than importing products in bulk.

Pinduoduo, the Chinese retailer behind Temu, has for years been on the U.S. list of "Notorious Markets for Counterfeiting and Piracy."

3 things to know before you go

Match Group, which owns dating apps including Tinder and Hinge, was sued on Wednesday in a suit claiming the apps are designed to hook users so the company to make more profit, rather than helping people find romantic partners.
Patrick Sison / AP
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AP
Match Group, which owns dating apps including Tinder and Hinge, was sued on Wednesday in a suit claiming the apps are designed to hook users so the company to make more profit, rather than helping people find romantic partners.

  1. The company behind the popular dating apps Tinder and Hinge is being sued for false advertising. The lawsuit alleges the Match Group's apps do not help people find love but instead turn them into "addicts" who keep paying for subscriptions and perks. 
  2. When JoAnne Foley was a new nurse in 1980, fatally ill babies were usually given minimal attention before they died. But a colleague and unsung hero's compassionate treatment of a dying baby girl helped shape her approach to nursing.
  3. If you have trouble saying "no" to people, take a lesson from this AI chatbot. The creators of Goody-2, the "most responsible" chatbot, programmed it to refuse every request.  

This newsletter was edited by Majd Al-Waheidi.

Copyright 2024 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Suzanne Nuyen