All Things Considered

Monday - Friday 4pm - 6pm, AM 670/89.9 FM

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience. However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered

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NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, NIAID director, about the rising COVID-19 infection rate, updating mask guidance, potential for booster shots and breakthrough infections.

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Say WeWork and one person comes to mind: Adam Neumann, the lanky founder and former CEO with flowing black hair and a rock-star persona who would carry on about the "energy" of the company's communal work spaces.

He also embraced a "party-boy life style," said Eliot Brown, whose new book with co-author Maureen Farrell, The Cult of We: WeWork and the Great Start-Up Delusion, was published on Tuesday.

Well before noon, Neumann was known to offer potential investors shots of tequila from a bottle he kept behind his desk.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

After a dizzying rally this year, stock markets were hit hard on Monday as a spike in coronavirus infections around the world reinforced the reality of living with a pandemic that refuses to go away.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbled 725 points, or 2.1%, and had its worst day since October, while the S&P 500 fell 1.6%.

The losses mark a rare day of declines for a market that was at record highs as early as last week.

Here are three key things to know about the market's fall.

In a first since President Biden took office, the Biden administration has transferred a detainee at the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, to Morocco, signaling a renewed effort to shrink the highly controversial prison's population — and possibly close it entirely.

Soccer player Megan Rapinoe, swimmer Katie Ledecky and gymnast Simone Biles are among the 11,000 athletes competing in the Tokyo Olympics beginning this week on July 23.

More than 600 athletes from across the U.S. are headed to Japan to represent Team USA, and they'll have to navigate the twists and turns of this year's unusual Olympic Games.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Back in May, a group of scientists — many at the top of the virology field — shifted the debate about the origins of COVID-19. They published a letter in the journal Science saying the lab-leak theory needs to be taken more seriously by the scientific community.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Texas already has some of the strictest voting laws in the country, and the state's Republicans are trying to make them even tougher. Most of the state's Democratic lawmakers have flown to Washington, D.C., to prevent a vote on legislation they call voter suppression.

In 1931, modern dance pioneer Ted Shawn purchased a farm in an isolated location in Western Massachusetts, as a retreat for his company. And over the years, Jacob's Pillow grew into one of the most important incubators of contemporary dance, not just for America, but for the world.

"This festival has never been canceled ever in its history," says director Pamela Tatge, "not even in World War II."

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